No One Ever Kicks a Dead Dog

February 14, 2013
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ID-10090943(1)When you are kicked and criticized, remember that is often done because it gives the kicker a feeling of importance. It often means that you are accomplishing something and are worthy of attention. Many people get a sense of savage satisfaction out of denouncing those who are better educated than they are or more successful.

For example, Dale Carnegie used to cite the case of Admiral Peary, the explorer who startled and thrilled the world by reaching the North Pole with dog sleds on April 6, 1909—a goal that brave men for centuries had suffered and starved and died to attain.  Peary himself almost died from cold and starvation; and eight of his toes were frozen so hard they had to be cut off. He was so overwhelmed with disasters that he feared he would go insane.

His superior naval officers in Washington were burned up because Peary was getting so much publicity and acclaim. So they accused him of collecting money for scientific expeditions and then “lying around and loafing in the Arctic.” Their determination to humiliate and block Peary was so violent that only a direct order from President McKinley enabled Peary to continue his career in the Arctic.

Would Peary have been denounced if he had had a desk job in the Navy Department in Washington? No. He wouldn’t have been important enough then to have aroused jealousy.

Remember—if you are tempted to be worried about unjust criticism, it’s often just a disguised compliment. No one ever kicks a dead dog.

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Photo credit: freedigitalphotos.net/imagerymajestic

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